The number of Americans filing new applications for unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest level in eight weeks, suggesting the labor market continued to strengthen despite the recent tightening in financial market conditions.
A top Federal Reserve official said on Friday he had seen enough healing in the U.S. labor market to warrant raising interest rates soon.
U.S. payrolls rose less than expected in August, but a drop in the unemployment rate to a near 7-1/2-year low of 5.1 percent and an acceleration in wages kept alive prospects of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike later this month.
The U.S. trade deficit fell in July to its lowest level in five months as exports rose broadly, signaling underlying strength in the economy amid concerns about a global growth slowdown.
U.S. private employers added fewer-than-expected workers in August, but the labor market momentum likely remains strong enough for the Federal Reserve to consider an interest rate hike this year.
The number of Americans filing new applications for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, pointing to a steadily firming labor market.
The U.S. economy grew faster than initially thought in the second quarter on solid domestic demand, showing fairly strong momentum that could still allow the Federal Reserve to hike interest rates this year.
U.S. consumer prices rose slightly in July as gasoline and food prices increased marginally, but a solid gain in shelter costs suggested inflation pressures were stabilizing enough to support expectations of an interest rate hike this year.
U.S. retail sales rebounded in July as households boosted purchases of automobiles and a range of other goods, suggesting solid momentum in the economy early in the third quarter.