Jobless

The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits held at a 43-year low last week, pointing to sustained labor market strength that could pave the way for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates in December.
The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits rose last week, but remained at levels consistent with a strengthening labor market.
The number of Americans filing new claims for jobless benefits rose last week for a third straight week, but the underlying trend continued to point to a solidly improving labor market.
The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits rose marginally last week, indicating the labor market remained on solid footing despite slowing economic growth.
U.S. stocks rose modestly on Thursday, partially rebounding after a recent bout of weakness, though a surprise drop in retail sales and a weak outlook from Intel limited the day's gains.
On Thursday, we witnessed the first time unemployment applications were up after recent numbers were lower, tied to weather conditions where applicants could not get to the unemployment offices.
Indeed, things are shaping up here in the U.S., but unfortunately this has not been the case in Europe. From Greek drama to Russian aggression, bad news seems to be the order of the day. Until now.

The dollar strengthened on speculation the Federal Reserve is still on course to raise interest rates this year after minutes of its

U.S. stocks advanced with the dollar, extending gains to a second day as the Federal Reserve signaled caution on rates even as growth shows signs of accelerating.

Claims for jobless benefits dropped last week in the U.S., matching the lowest level in four years, more evidence the labor market is improving.