James Bullard

U.S. interest rates can likely remain low through at least 2017, with no clear sense yet of whether the new Trump administration's policies will touch off higher inflation or growth, St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank President James Bullard said on Thursday.
The U.S. economy will remain in a low interest rate "regime" for perhaps two to three more years, St. Louis Federal Reserve President James Bullard said on Thursday, repeating his call that a single interest rate increase would be adequate for the foreseeable future.
St. Louis Federal Reserve President James Bullard said on Monday global markets appear to be "well-prepared" for a summer interest rate hike from the Fed, although he did not specify a date for the policy move.

Two days of decent gains appear to have taken their toll on European equity markets with futures pointing to a slightly softer open on Thursday. 

The continued rout in global oil markets may have caused a "worrisome" drop in U.S.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President James Bullard said U.S. unemployment may drop to 6.5% by the middle of next year and prompt the central bank to raise its benchmark interest rate from near zero.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President James Bullard said central bank stimulus has been ramped up this year with the decision to increase outright bond purchases to $85 billion a month and that a growing balance sheet could be complicated to unwind.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President James Bullard said signs of more stability in U.S. fiscal policy, the housing market and the global economy will probably help fuel economic growth in 2013.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President James Bullard said policy makers should wait for more data before deciding on “big action” to boost the economy.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President James Bullard said recent signs of improvement in the economy would prompt him to oppose any new program by the Fed to buy bonds to reduce borrowing costs.