Grains

Attention is all on this morning’s USDA report, out at 11 am CT. Corn prospective acres are expected to come in near 94 million. Quarterly stocks are expected to come in near 8.134 billion bushels.
May corn continue to grind higher yesterday, despite news that two more ethanol plants will be closing, due to negative margins. Export sales this morning came in at a whopping 1,814,300 for old crop corn.
May soybeans extended their rally yesterday on the back of hopes for better demand and potential port disruptions in South America. The market is giving back some of those gains in the early morning trade.
Corn futures staged nice recovery early yesterday but failed to hold all the gains into the close. This morning, prices are working back towards the top end of yesterday’s range.
Outside markets will continue to have a bearing on the grain sector, if we can avoid the limit down days and peak panic environment like we saw yesterday, we think the market can focus back on its own fundamentals.
Soybean futures got taken to the woodshed yesterday, alongside nearly everything else. Outside markets have firmed in the overnight/early morning trade which has helped offer relief to beans.
Soybean futures got taken to the woodshed yesterday, alongside nearly everything else. Outside markets have firmed in the overnight/early morning trade which has helped offer relief to beans.
S&P 500 futures touched price limit down at 2819 down -148 points (-5%) Sunday evening as of this writing. The markets are spooked by corporate earnings slowing from coronavirus and the new oil trade war clash between prominent OPEC members Russia and Saudi Arabia.  
Oliver Sloup breaks down the trading day in grain futures markets.
May corn futures continued to drift lower yesterday and the technical landscape has gone from bad to worse over the past few sessions