fiscal cliff

As Congress returns this week to confront immediate budget issues that have consumed the debate in Washington, lawmakers are preparing to pivot to topics such as immigration, gun control and energy policy.
Two F-16 fighter jets scrambled on Sunday when several small civilian aircraft wandered into restricted air space over where President Obama was playing golf with Tiger Woods in my adopted state of Florida. Our tax dollars at work.
Though the fiscal cliff was avoided narrowly, it wasn’t without bad feelings, threats (from both sides), anger and deal-making. The best that can be said of it is, it’s done for now.
As it turned out, the end of 2012 was not the end of the U.S. economy and the “fiscal cliff” was a mere scarecrow and not the doom of the financial markets. A rally began. Will it be the long-awaited rally that could bring precious metals to their new all-time high?
Most U.S. stocks fell, following yesterday’s advance, as economic concern after the World Bank downgraded global growth forecasts tempered a rally in Apple Inc. and investors watched corporate earnings.
The Canadian dollar fell against most of its major peers as government officials in Russia and Japan criticized monetary policies that have devalued major currencies in an attempt to spark economic growth.
In spite of market participants focusing more of their attention on the perception of what global oil demand might be down the road, the nearby fundamentals remains mostly biased to the bearish side.
Weaker growth, the U.S. debt ceiling discussions and the hopes for more central bank stimulus have been supporting gold prices.
Weaker growth, the U.S. debt ceiling discussions and the hopes for more central bank stimulus have been supporting gold prices.
February editor's note from Ginger Szala