financials

The biggest gold producers say global output will fall short of expectations and is poised to decline after the worst price slump in three decades spurred them to cut spending and revise mining plans.
Manufacturing expanded at a faster pace than projected in February, a sign the industry was beginning to overcome bad weather across much of the U.S.
Let’s see. Manufacturing in the world’s biggest economy ground to a halt in January. The benchmark Treasury yields is at its lowest in three months and stock indexes can’t hold onto earlier signs of a rally. So then that likely puts the CBOE Volatility Index at a sky high reading of 20.0.
Even after five years of the Fed’s most aggressive accommodative policy in history, there is still a lack of hoped for quality credit creation in the economy, which could be a sign that the greatest deleveraging of the U.S. economy since the Great Depression is still not complete. The Fed’s unrelenting dovish policy appears to support this concern.
Even after five years of the Fed’s most aggressive accommodative policy in history, there is still a lack of hoped for quality credit creation in the economy, which could be a sign that the greatest deleveraging of the U.S. economy since the Great Depression is still not complete. The Fed’s unrelenting dovish policy appears to support this concern.
Gold shot up this morning on weak economic data, trading as high as $1,264.70, but is now down to $1,259. Our technical levels on gold are clear.
The U.S. Federal Reserve decided to withdraw $10 billion from its monthly purchases in spite of the global concerns and the slowdown in emerging markets and that concerned investors are now left “wondering” what the next “shoe to drop” will be.
American factories expanded in January at the weakest pace in eight months as orders slumped, a sign manufacturing cooled at the start of the year along with the weather.
In December the Federal Reserve saw enough evidence of economic strength to begin tapering its Quantitative Easing (QE3) program and markets are adjusting to this new reality. So far it has been a tough pill to swallow with emerging markets being the first to feel the pains of withdrawal.
The Libyan Investment Authority recently sued Goldman over some 2008-vintage derivatives trades gone wrong. I wrote about it last week but didn't yet have Libya's complaint. That came out today -- here is the complaint, or in British the "Particulars of Claim" -- and it's fun reading