equities

World stocks tumbled and European bank shares were on track for their biggest ever two-day fall today as the political and economic fallout of Britain's shock vote to leave the European Union drove sterling to a fresh 31-year low against the dollar.
Brexit is a Bear Stearns moment, not a Lehman moment. That's not to diminish what's happening (markets felt like death in March, 2008), but this isn't the event to make you run for the hills.
Global stocks rose sharply today and sterling strengthened broadly while safe-havens including the yen and gold retreated, after polls showed support for Britain staying in the European Union regaining momentum before Thursday's referendum.
Global stocks rose sharply today and sterling strengthened broadly while safe-havens including the yen and gold retreated, after polls showed support for Britain staying in the European Union regaining momentum before Thursday's referendum.
In spite of the latest forecast from the International Energy Agency (IEA) yesterday suggesting that the global crude oil market is already rebalancing the market has been in a retracement mode since late last week
Dan Collins, Editor in Chief at Modern Trader magazine talks about how managed futures are an alternative investment strategy using futures that are increasing in popularity.
It’s been an exceedingly slow start to the week with most of Europe out of the office for an extended holiday weekend, but trade is starting to pick up modestly heading into the U.S. session.

The lower 2016 rate hike projections from the FOMC are a clear win for the U.S. equities bulls.

 


Ten-year Treasuries are making a new session low in front of the revised report on Q4 2015 GDP which is expected to show +0.4% growth v. an estimated of +0.7% in its initial update.

Gold bars? ETFs? Junior miners? Royalty streams? Majors with dividends?