Energy

Oil prices edged higher on Thursday after the International Energy Agency (IEA) said the market was nearing balance, while U.S. data showing higher production kept gains in check.
The shale oil boom has transformed the U.S. and global energy sector to such an extent that it has upended traditional supply dynamics and made forecasts far more polarized.
The stream of U.S. energy companies going public at the start of 2017 has dried up on concerns over the future direction of oil prices, but private buyers seeking mergers and acquisitions are ready to take advantage of the volatility to secure cheap deals.
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Oil futures held steady on Monday as a rebound in Libyan oil production over the weekend weighed against upbeat economic data from Asia that pointed to strong energy demand from the region.
A severe disruption to Libyan oil supplies and comments from officials suggesting OPEC could extend its production cuts deal to the end of the year boosted oil prices on Tuesday.
President Donald Trump’s White House has said his plans to slash environmental regulations will trigger a new energy boom and help the United States drill its way to independence from foreign oil.
Oil prices fell on Thursday after U.S. crude stocks hit an all-time high and official data showed Russian oil production unchanged in February, with no further cuts to tighten the market and drain global oversupply.
Economic conditions are improving. After contracting 1 % in 2016, country GDP is expected to grow as much as 2.8 % this year.
Oil traders from around the world, including the United States, Britain and Brazil, have tripled their sales to Asia as they take advantage of an emerging supply gap following OPEC-led production cuts announced late last year.