January 2015

By Andrew Wilkinson
After six years of a zero-interest-rate-policy (ZIRP), U.S. interest rates are set to go up. But that does not mean a straight shot up. The Fed has not been in a hurry and with inflation low, can manage the next stage of interest rate management.
By Andrew Wilkinson
After six years of a zero-interest-rate-policy (ZIRP), U.S. interest rates are set to go up. But that does not mean a straight shot up. The Fed has not been in a hurry and with inflation low, can manage the next stage of interest rate management.
By Daniel P. Collins
Reading the bond market and the machinations of the Federal Reserve is difficult work. So much analysis comes from folks trying to affect policy. Here our experts give their take on where rates are likely to go in 2015.
By Hugh Carter Donahue
The entire fixed income complex, from corporates to mortgage backed to benchmark Treasuries, went through a shock in 2008 and has not recovered. What will it take to fix the broken bond market?
By Daniel P. Collins
January Editor's Note from Dan Collins.
By Ashraf Laidi

As oil fell for six straight months in the second half of 2014, plunging 47% to post its biggest decline since the 2008-09 crisis, the reaction in energy-dependent currencies has yet to unravel. The worst performing currencies so far have been the Russian ruble, down 43%, followed by the Norwegian krone and Mexican peso at -16% and -12% respectively.

By Randall Liss
How can you take profit on a winning trade yet maintain upside potential?
By Steven K. Beckner

The year ahead looks to be one of change for U.S. monetary policy, and change is often painful. Memories of the “taper tantrum” of 2013, when former Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s hints of a scale-down of large-scale asset purchases caused sharp spikes in bond yields and mortgage interest rates, remain fresh on the minds of Federal Reserve policymakers.

By Nick Mastrandrea
Early morning trading is often viewed as “dangerous” because of a lack of liquidity at that time of day. Here, we help dispel that myth.
By Al Brooks
Timing trades is often the difference between profit and loss. Here’s how to manage your entries and exits as part of a price action trading program.
By Howard L. Simons
Financial regulation has been shaped by financial crises, but the effects of this can be seen in some markets more than others.
By Jean Folger
With powerful modern trading tools, volume analysis is more accessible than it has ever been before. In this article, we’ll explore ways to put that analysis to use.
By Skylar Zhang
New developments in traders’ technology are moving toward greater accessibility. What that means for the trading world is still yet to be seen.
By Phil Flynn

When U.S. shale oil production continued to soar and cut in on OPEC’s market share, the Saudis said enough was enough. The Saudis tried to laugh off the U.S. shale revolution, but then the laughter stopped. Fortunately for U.S.

By Tim Fligg

The recent dramatic drop in crude oil prices has been blamed on Saudi Arabia and OPEC trying to take a shot at U.S. shale oil producers. With its recent decision not to cut output and Iraqi crude shipments expected to increase to a record level the real question is: Can the members of OPEC even afford to cut output because of this drop?

By Daniel P. Collins

Anyone involved with trading will tell you that good timing is an important attribute to have. Rob Hartman, while not a “market timer” per se, has pretty good timing.