Record heating bills seen in U.S. with colder winter

U.S. households that use heating oil will face record prices this winter as weather forecasters predict colder temperatures in the Northeast that will drive up demand, according to a government report.

The Energy Information Administration, which tracks and analyzes energy data, projects households will spend 19 percent more on average for heating oil and 15 percent more for natural gas from Oct. 1 to March 31, the period covered in its short- term energy and winter fuels outlook released today.

“It is going to be colder than last year and as a result of that, heating bills are going to be higher,” said Adam Sieminski, administrator of EIA, in Washington today.

About half of U.S. households use natural gas as their main heating source. While only 6 percent of U.S. homes use heating oil, 80 percent of families that use the fuel are clustered in the northeastern part of the country, according to the EIA.

The EIA report says its prediction for higher heating bills stems from an expected return to normal winter temperatures east of the Rocky Mountains compared with last winter’s unusual warmth.

Predictions of higher energy costs may weigh on President Barack Obama’s re-election chances by compounding voters’ economic anxiety in the last few weeks before the Nov. 6 election.

Increased Production

The agency expects that households relying on heating oil will spend an average of about $407 more this winter, 19 percent more than last year, as a result of an increase in prices and consumption. The average expenditures are expected to reach record levels, according to the EIA.

In other ways, the EIA report may help Obama, who has disputed Republican claims he has been overly focused on developing renewable sources of energy rather than on extracting cheaper fossil fuels.

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