Crude oil and byproduct supply disparity is leveling off

I am expecting a modest draw in crude oil stocks in Cushing, Ok as the Seaway pipeline is now pumping and refinery run rates are continuing at high levels in that region of the US. This would be bearish for the Brent/WTI spread in the short term which is now trading around the $17.50/bbl premium to Brent level. I am still of the view that the spread will continue the process of normalization over the next 6 months.

With refinery runs expected to decrease by 0.5% I am expecting a small draw in gasoline stocks. Gasoline stocks are expected to decrease by 0.5 million barrels which would result in the gasoline year over year deficit coming in around 8.2 million barrels while the deficit versus the five-year average for the same week will come in around 4.4 million barrels.  

Distillate fuel is projected to increase by 0.5 million barrels. If the actual EIA data is in sync with my distillate fuel projection inventories versus last year will likely now be about 31 million barrels below last year while the deficit versus the five year average will come in around 26.3 million barrels. Exports of distillate fuel have been the main storyline this year with exports running around 1 million bpd.

The following table compares my projections for this week's report (for the categories I am making projections) with the change in inventories for the same period last year. As you can see from the table last year's inventories are mostly in the same direction as the projections. As such if the actual data is in line with the projections there will only be a modest change in the year over year comparisons for most of the complex. 

I still think the oil price is overvalued and getting toppy at current levels as it approaches a key technical resistance area. WTI is still currently in a $90 to $100/bbl trading range while Brent is in a $105 to $115 trading range. There are a lot of dynamics that will impact oil prices in the short term and the ranking of the price drivers are fluid and very susceptible to changing. The only constant for oil prices in the short term is above normal levels of volatility. Geopolitics are currently moving back into the foreground and starting to play a role in price setting once again as well as the perception of more stimulus.

I am moving my view back to neutral as the warm weather may be returning and could support prices in the short term. If so the upcoming injections could continue to underperform history and thus result in the overhang of Nat Gas in inventory continuing to narrow as it has been for the vast majority of the injection season to date. 

Markets are mixed heading into Asian trading hours as shown in the following table.

 

Best regards,           

Dominick A. Chirichella

dchirichella@mailaec.com

Follow my intraday comments on Twitter @dacenergy.

 

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