Euro climbs on projections Greek pro-bailout parties take majority

Euro appreciated 0.5 percent to $1.2699 in early trading

Greek Debt

Sarkozy since became the first French president in 30 years to fail to win re-election. The standing of Hollande’s Socialist Party was further bolstered following yesterday’s parliamentary election in France. The party and its allies won an absolute majority in the National Assembly, exit polls showed, paving the way for them to pass legislation without the aid of other members of parliament.

In Germany, Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union had its worst-ever result in an election last month in the country’s most populous state.

Of Greece’s 266 billion euros of debt, about 194 billion euros, or 73 percent, is held by the European Central Bank, euro-area governments and the IMF, according to the Greek debt management office in Athens. In 2010, before the first bailout, Greece owed about 310 billion euros, all to the private sector.

Bond Restructuring

Greece completed the largest bond restructuring in history in March, as holders forgave more than 100 billion euros on their government securities.

Since then, Greek bonds issued under the terms of the deal have slumped. The 2 percent note due February 2023 was at 16.42 percent of face value on June 15, down from 28.68 percent on March 15. The bonds yielded 27.13 percent last week.

German two-year yields turned negative for the first time on June 1, meaning investors were paying for the safety of holding the region’s safest assets, while 10-year rates touched an all-time low of 1.127 percent the same day.

“If these polls prove to be accurate and New Democracy can form a coalition, then there is some scope for a relief rally,” said Simon Smith, chief economist at foreign-exchange broker FXPro Group Ltd. in London. “There’s so much uncertainty about whether a viable coalition will be formed that the market will still be skeptical. It’s still a long road for Greece. We are bearish euro.”

Bloomberg News

--With assistance from David Goodman in London. Editors: Benjamin Purvis, Garfield Reynolds

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