Gensler updates Senate on Dodd-Frank

Derivatives Markets

Each part of our nation’s economy relies on a well-functioning derivatives marketplace. The derivatives market – including both the historically regulated futures market and the heretofore unregulated swaps market – is essential so that producers, merchants and end-users can manage their risks and lock in prices for the future. Derivatives help these entities focus on what they know best – innovation, investment and producing goods and selling and services – while finding others in a marketplace willing to bear the uncertain risks of changes in prices or rates.

With notional values of more than $300 trillion in the United States – that’s more than $20 of swaps for every dollar of goods and services produced in the U.S. economy – derivatives markets must work for the benefit of the American public. Members of the public keep their savings with banks and pension funds that use swaps to manage interest rate risks. The public buys gasoline and groceries from companies that rely upon futures and swaps to hedge swings in commodity prices.

That’s why oversight must ensure that these markets function with integrity, transparency, openness and competition, free from fraud, manipulation and other abuses. Though the CFTC is not a price-setting agency, recent volatility in prices for basic commodities – agricultural and energy – are very real reminders of the need for common sense rules in all of the derivatives markets.

The Dodd-Frank Act

To address the real weaknesses in swaps market oversight exposed by the financial crisis, the CFTC is working to implement the Dodd-Frank Act’s swaps oversight reforms.

Broadening the Scope

Foremost, the Dodd-Frank Act broadened the scope of oversight. The CFTC and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) will, for the first time, have oversight of the swaps and security-based swaps markets.

Promoting Transparency

Importantly, the Dodd-Frank Act brings transparency to the swaps marketplace. Economists and policymakers for decades have recognized that market transparency benefits the public.

The more transparent a marketplace is, the more liquid it is, the more competitive it is and the lower the costs for hedgers, which ultimately leads to lower costs for borrowers and the public.

The Dodd-Frank Act brings transparency to the three phases of a transaction.

First, it brings pre-trade transparency by requiring standardized swaps – those that are cleared, made available for trading and not blocks – to be traded on exchanges or swap execution facilities.

Second, it brings real-time post-trade transparency to the swaps markets. This provides all market participants with important pricing information as they consider their investments and whether to lower their risk through similar transactions.

Third, it brings transparency to swaps over the lifetime of the contracts. If the contract is cleared, the clearinghouse will be required to publicly disclose the pricing of the swap. If the contract is bilateral, swap dealers will be required to share mid-market pricing with their counterparties.

The Dodd-Frank Act also includes robust recordkeeping and reporting requirements for all swaps transactions so that regulators can have a window into the risks posed to the system and can police the markets for fraud, manipulation and other abuses.

On July 7, the Commission voted for a significant final rule establishing that clearinghouses and swaps dealers must report to the CFTC information about the swaps activities of large traders in the commodity swaps markets. For decades, the American public has benefited from the Commission’s gathering of large trader data in the futures market, and now will benefit from this additional information to police the commodity swaps markets.

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