From the July 01, 2011 issue of Futures Magazine • Subscribe!

Fed tightening: What’s the rush?

Market Watch

There are basically two possible motivations for credit tightening:

  1. An acceleration of GDP growth accompanied by falling unemployment, and
  2. An unexpected pick-up in inflation and/or inflation expectations by the Fed.

A third possibility would be a traditional mix of faster growth and increased price pressures.

What we’ve been getting so far, in this subnormal recovery, is sluggish growth, still high unemployment and a rise in inflation that Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and most of his colleagues regard as "transitory."

The clear preference of the FOMC majority is to keep a high level of monetary accommodation in place to support growth and job creation — so as long as, in their view, inflation remains tame and inflation expectations "well-anchored."

Most policymakers envision — and hope for — a scenario in which inflation pressures hold off long enough to allow them to continue to stimulate growth and reduce resource slack by keeping short-term rates very low and putting downward pressure on longer-term rates via quantitative easing.

Although "QE2" has run its course, there is apt to be no rush to unload the securities in the Fed’s portfolio and thereby reduce bank reserves. Even a "passive" shrinkage of the balance sheet, which would be accomplished by ceasing to reinvest principal payments from its securities holdings, likely will be delayed for some time.

This means that, quantitatively, the Fed will be providing plenty of accommodation well past the end of QE2.

The first tightening step, as the minutes confirm, would be to discontinue reinvestment. About the same time the FOMC probably also would remove from its policy statement its quasi-commitment to keep the funds rate "exceptionally low…for an extended period."

However, officials stress those actions would not necessarily mean that rate hikes would necessarily follow within any certain time frame.

Bernanke defines "extended period" as "a couple of meetings." Others call that a bare minimum. Kocherlakota says markets should not "think for sure that we’re going to tighten after two meetings" once that language is dumped.

It all will depend on how the key indicators behave.

If inflation flares in a more persistent way, the FOMC might feel forced to tighten earlier, even if unemployment remains high, but that is not the hope or expectation.

Steve Beckner is senior correspondent for Market News International. He is heard regularly on National Public Radio and is the author of "Back From The Brink: The Greenspan Years" (Wiley).

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About the Author
Steven K. Beckner

Steve Beckner is senior correspondent for Market News International. He is heard regularly on National Public Radio and is the author of "Back From The Brink: The Greenspan Years" (Wiley).

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