Weather, speculative buying move grains

Soybeans: Beans traded more than a 20 cent range Monday but closed only a penny lower for the session. Funds were sellers of 1,000 contracts and there were less than 66,000 contracts traded for the day in July. This shows the lack of news but could continue to get pushed around with corn and wheat. We were able to see July beans push above 1400 again, but the contract wasn’t able to close above it. The long-term trend is higher, and if we don’t see a push above resistance Tuesday, we could retest the 1340 as support.

I am still expecting beans to be a follower as we move through the next few weeks. If corn and wheat go lower, beans will follow. If they go higher, beans will follow. The outside markets haven’t been much of an influence lately, but we are seeing the energies, metals and the financial markets selling off as they close today. That could get beans on the defensive early tonight. The dollar is finding strength right now as well…Steve Georgy

Wheat: Wheat sold off Monday in sympathy with the corn market. With the planting window opening up, funds were sellers of the corn and that pressured that market. Also adding to the negative pressure to the market was having rain fall in parts of Oklahoma and Texas overnight. The biggest question coming into Monday’s trade was whether the cold temperatures in the plains these past three mornings hurt the crop or not.

According to our lead meteorologist Drew Lerner, most of the lowest temperatures were not cold enough in areas where crops are most advanced to causes permanent damage. Most of the impacted wheat areas are in the joint stage so it was be able to handle the cold. More cold is on the way, so the situation will need to be monitored.

Demand wise, Lebanon is tendering 50,000 tonnes of wheat and South Korea purchased 275,000 tonnes over the weekend. The weekly crop ratings were released after the close today. They showed that 41% of the crop is rated very poor to poor. While only 34% of the crop is rated good to excellent. The spring wheat planting continues to drag; only 10% of the crop is planted compared to the five-year average of 43%. Last year at this time we had 57% of the crop planted by this date. North Dakota has only 1% of their crop in the ground. They normally have 32% planted by now. Minnesota is 3% planted vs. 41% average while Montana is only 7% planted compared to 46% average. These planting delays should be viewed bullish for the Minneapolis Grain Exchanges spring wheat contract…Jim McCormick

Ryan Ettner is a registered commodities broker and grains analyst at Allendale, Inc. Steve Georgy is a Sr. Broker/Manager at Allendale, Inc. Jim McCormick is a Sr. Broker at Allendale, Inc. Allendale is registered with the CFTC and NFA and is a member of the NIBA. www.allendale-inc.com.

<< Page 2 of 2
About the Author

Ryan Ettner is a registered commodities broker and grains analyst at Allendale, Inc. Steve Georgy is a Sr. Broker/Manager at Allendale, Inc. Jim McCormick is Senior Broker/Manager at Allendale, Inc. Allendale is registered with the CFTC and NFA and is a member of the NIBA. www.allendale-inc.com

Comments
comments powered by Disqus
Check out Futures Magazine - Polls on LockerDome on LockerDome